GSV re-opens!

GSV opens the doors at our new Research and Education Centre on Tuesday NEXT WEEK – 4 APRIL – L6, 85 Queen Street, Melbourne.

Two Events next week:

Wed 5 April at 12.30 pm – The GSV Writers Circle meets to review two pieces of writing submitted by members – one ‘The Odyssey of Two Families: the Dedes and the Wares’ and the other a saga of Simeon Kneebone and family: two generations of a mining family from Gwennap, Cornwall. The writers of these interesting developed drafts will have the opportunity to discuss their writing with the members of this Group, and receive useful feedback: everything from meaning and structure to style and punctuation. GSV Members only (but you can join on the day and see if this Group could be useful for you).

Thurs 6 April – Special Class:  10.00am – 1.00pm – English Research 1700-1837
Speaker: Alan Fincher
How to trace your English ancestors pre-civil registration, through church records, maps, wills, educational, occupational and military records, newspapers, and land related records – with relevant sources and websites.
Members $45  –  Non-members $90 – Bookings essential. 

Post expires at 8:08pm on Thursday 20 April 2017

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Review of ‘Evernote for Genealogy’ guidebook

How to use Evernote for Genealogy: A step-by-step guide to organise your research and boost your genealogy productivity

Author: Kerry Scott

Publisher: Family Tree Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2015

Review by Penny Mercer, March 2017

This is a well-written and easy to follow book on how to use this note-taking and information-organising software. The author uses Evernote to organise and classify information found, information needed, research plans according to repository and even DNA data matching.

The twelve chapters cover a basic introduction, how to input data, how to find data, how to tag data, different types and formats of data, sharing and collaborating, syncing, backing up and troubleshooting. Throughout there are screenshots, clear explanations and family history relevant examples. The appendices include a series of suggested templates for use by family historians.

Even though I have not yet tried the software, I found this book to be easy to follow. While clearly a fan and heavy user of the software, the author explains a few limitations, and is fair in assessing the features. One criticism I have is that the author doesn’t mention how this might, or might not connect with the use of traditional family history software.

I was about to download the software when I discovered that the company has made some changes since this book was published, particularly to pricing of the premium version. So before you invest a lot of effort in one version, you need to check the relative costs and benefits of the program options for your needs.

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A family history takes shape

 

23 March 2017

At the next GSV Writers Circle meeting (for members) on 5 April at our new Research and Education Centre, the group will discuss and offer suggestions on draft pieces of family history writing submitted by two of the Group. One of this month’s writers can rarely attend the Group as she lives interstate, but she still joins in and benefits from the GSV Writers Circle by way of email. She writes: I circulated this story at the end of last year. I received one small correction and a detailed and very helpful review… I am re-circulating it again for discussion at the April meeting. Much [extra research] has happened in the almost six month since I wrote it… Whilst I had intended to make only small changes now and to wait until after the April meeting to revise the story, I have done a little more than I originally intended and also worked on the majority of [the previous] suggestions… While I was writing the background to [this] life I realised that the two-generation story was more interesting.’ Where else can you receive knowledgeable help with your writing – the GSV Writers Circle includes many published writers – at no additional cost to your GSV membership? The aim of this GSV group is to help its members turn their research into accurate and readable stories. Your research deserves to be told and kept for the future.

Post expires at 8:10pm on Thursday 20 April 2017

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GSV Writers discuss Writing Reviews

Louise Wilson and GSV Writers (Photo. G. Nicholas)

Friday 10 March

Writing Reviews: basics and a touch of the unexpected

Gayle Nicholas.

It was hot in Melbourne on 1 March as members of the GSV Writers Circle gathered for their monthly discussion at Emirates House for the last time. The conversation was initially dominated by the imminent change in location of the Society and some members were recalling previous GSV locations, such as Block Arcade.

The focus of this meeting was on Book Reviews, and under Louise Wilson’s adept leadership books had been selected, reviews planned or pondered on, or already written.

Louise was well prepared and there was much for members of the group to think about. Members’ reasons for choosing books for the session included prior knowledge of the author and personal or research connections to people and places featuring in the selected book. The discussion soon moved to whether our choices were helping us as writers. Discussion emerged on the need to found writing in research and to use citations as members had come across family histories without sources. The cusp between history and creative writing, an area of ongoing interest to writers, was also raised.

The group was challenged by a question regarding the impact on target readers of titles and covers. The newly released Victoria the Queen has a cover appealing to current day readers and is receiving favourable reviews.   Louise placed book reviews in time and place. Mary Durack’s Kings in Grass Castles has received less impressive reviews in recent times while continuing to maintain sales.

‘Should authors review books?’ asked Louise after sharing her own experiences as a reviewer. Louise argued that authors bring something extra to reviewing because of their experience and that reviews should incorporate the intellectual and emotional responses of the reviewer. Discussion extended to whether and how authors should respond directly to reviewers. Examples of responses generally considered appropriate, and others not so appropriate, were weighed up.

Most reviews written for this session were based on Ancestor publishing requirements.   Discussion of Ancestor’s practice of publishing reviews of (recently released?) genealogical resources rather than family histories may well have sown seeds of change.

A newly animated group of writers dispersed into the Library and the hot city with new thoughts and questions to ponder. The next meeting will be in the new GSV premises.

 

 

Post expires at 7:54pm on Wednesday 10 May 2017

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Lease signed for GSV’s new home

28 February 2017

We have now signed the formal lease documentation for our new Centre at Level 6, 85 Queen Street, and will gradually move in over the last three weeks of March, opening our doors on TUESDAY 4 APRIL. Orientation meetings have been arranged for our Volunteers to assist them with the delivery of our Member services in our new home. We have commenced the cleanup of our current premises in anticipation of packing our books and other items during the week commencing Monday 13 March. Thank you to those who are currently helping us with our move. Quite a few additional volunteers will be needed to help in various ways. If you are available to assist during the period from Monday 6 March through to Monday 3 April, please email your availability to Allan Aberdeen, who is in charge of the overall management of this process or Claire Johnson via gsv@gsv.org.au.

Post expires at 7:48pm on Thursday 20 April 2017

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New premises for the GSV announced

10 February 2017
David Down, GSV President, announced on 10 February, that the GSV has located new premises for its offices at Level 6, 85 Queen Street, Melbourne. This will be known as the ‘GSV Research and Education Centre’.
The current Collins Street location will be closed from, and including, Monday 13 March. The new Centre in Queen Street is planned to open for weekday operations from TUESDAY 4 APRIL and Saturday access will begin on 22 April. GSV looks forward to welcoming you at its new Centre.

Post expires at 7:46pm on Thursday 20 April 2017

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